Why? It’s Her Story

Breena Clarke talks a

Breena Professional PhotoThe impetus for beginning to write River, Cross My Heart came directly as a result of having listened to an oral history that my mother had taped at my request. She and my father grew up in the Georgetown section of Washington, D.C and their memories of the neighborhood were vivid. It was more than facts that they related. They related a sense of community that enforced social segregation made imperative, but that nevertheless was a source of their positive sense of themselves. I regretted that the stories of Washington’s neighborhoods were not known, were not being told. Why not, I wondered? It gave me a lot of energy to galvanize my research work as being necessary, being purposeful.

read the interview:

http://bit.ly/28XBEDv       IMG_0598

see the complete list of historical novels by women recommended for Black History Month 2017 by Herstory Novels : http://herstorynovels.com/read-african-american-history-month/

for more information about Breena Clarke’s books:  www.BreenaClarke.com

Ah, beauty is a complex play of familiarity and surprise!

Dossie Smoot           hanging-plum_1

She’s a pretty little dark plum. Had he trespassed? He had asked her. Ha! She wanted him, she had said, and seemed to. He knew damned well he had a sway with her. Hell, he’d counted on that. Little Bird was so obedient to him now that he was afraid of himself. What was a man supposed to do when a lucky coin cross his path? He will close his hand around it. He will praise his good fortune. But still in all, this ain’t the same as trifling with a grown woman, Duncan argued with himself.

from Angels Make Their Hope Here by Breena Clarke

Read an excerpt:  http://bit.ly/1NZsFus

for more information on Breena Clarke’s books, visit: www.BreenaClarke.com

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Our Trespasses

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StewartMaria_132Prior to the great personal watershed of 1849 when he rescued my mother, then a child, Duncan Smoot was known on the underground circuit as The Moses of Octoraro Creek. Because of his exploits, he was well respected amongst those who knew and emulated the brave ones who worked to free people from slavery. However, in the course of rescuing Mother, he did something that curtailed his effectiveness as a conductor and troubled him for some time after.

from The Moses of Octoraro Creek by Breena Clarke, published in issue #5 STONECOAST REVIEW,  http://www.stonecoastreview.org a literary arts journal published biannually by students and alumni from the Stonecoast MFA in Creative Writing (University of Southern Maine). Breena Clarke is a member of the fiction faculty at Stonecoast. for more about the Stonecoast MFA in Creative Writing: http://www.stonecoastreview.org/our-staff/

read the story: http://bit.ly/28KVhj9

IMG_3709  Breena Clarke’s books are available in all formats.

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Our Father’s Days

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She called him John Cleary. She was a sweet gal and she risked her life for me and the boy was mine. He was a cute little bastard.

Enter the mind of the bounty hunter, James Cleary. Read Breena Clarke’s riveting account,   “The People Catcher: Mr. Woolfolk’s Bounty” online at KWELI Journal, Truth From The Diaspora’s Boldest Voices        http://bit.ly/1ZcWlvG

Fugitives i color

for more information about Breena Clarke’s work: www.BreenaClarke.com

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A Sunday Reading for February

Breena Clarke reads a searing excerpt from her novel, STAND THE STORM, set in mid-19th century Washington, D.C.

The complete, unabridged audiobook version of STAND THE STORM is available on Audible.com at stand the storm by breena clarke, audiobook

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Written By: Breena Clarke

Narrated By: Richard Allen

Publisher: Tantor Media

Date: October 2008

Duration: 10 hours 28 minutes

for more information about Breena Clarke’s books, go to www.BreenaClarke.com

 

Since when is new?

“New York! New Amsterdam! Act! Grandmother spit when she say it. She say ‘since when is new?’ Grandmother’s spittle runs into our creeks. It sustains us. We won’t die of thirst in these hills.Our Grandmother sleeps there up ahead. She is taking her well-earned nap. Her lips fall back. Spittle runs our of the side of her mouth while she sleeps. The hills, the outcropping, the ridges, these are her misshapen teeth. Them sharp juts are what remain when flesh pulls back from bone.”  from ANGELS MAKE THEIR HOPE HERE

Angels Make Their Hope Here     Dossie Smoot

Since when is new, I ask. I write historical fiction primarily from an urge to re-tell the past, rehabilitate the skimpy, fractured, fragmented narratives of the people of The Americas, the so-called New World. I believe that much of the national narrative of The United States is based on limited facts, racially motivated lies and the visceral belief that all people are NOT created equally. .Sometimes it feels like I have a score to settle. I think I must be a caretaker of imagination so that our race of people are not unimagined and thus disappear from the earth. I feel I need to be  like Scheherazade. I survive daily because I’m able to continue to tell stories of myself/OURSELVES. 

                                 Breena Clarke

read an excerpt of ANGELS MAKE THEIR HOPE HERE  http://bit.ly/2kUtZZ4

visit Breena’s website: www.BreenaClarke.com

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The Beautiful Necessaries: Quilts in 19th Century African American life.

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“Control of the finished product becomes a metaphor for self-emancipation.”                                                                                                                                             Breena  Clarke

Through the lens of her brilliantly engaging novel, STAND THE STORM, Breena Clarke talks about textiles, quilting and enslavement.

View one of Harriet Powers’ stunning quilts:

http://www.mfa.org/collections/object/pictorial-quilt-116166

more about Harriet Powers – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harriet_Powers

Discussing the African American experience in 19th Century Washington, D.C. Breena Clarke shares insights about the characters of STAND THE STORM.

Read an excerpt of STAND THE STORMhttp://bit.ly/2kNABZR

for more information about the novels of Breena Clarke, visit: www.BreenaClarke.com

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Breena Clarke’s books