Fat and Grinning: a novel in weekly episodes

“Why did I love him so? Why still? Why, at a time when I was vulnerable, did I cling to his silly advice songs? It made no sense then. It makes less now. Why do I love him? Who cares. I just do,” says Gardenia Meadows, the biggest, the oldest, the longest, the staunchest, the most devoted fan in all of fandom. She loves Fats Waller and refuses to apologize.

circa 1935: American jazz musician Fats Waller (1904-1943) smiles in front of a CBS radio microphone. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

When Eleanor Bumpers, an old, arthritic Black woman is killed by police in Bronx, New York , Gardenia Meadows falls into a funk and turns to a familiar friend, the legendary Sultan of Silliness and Master of the Stride Piano, Fats Waller. How did this friendship get started? Are they just friends? What is the connection between Gardenia and Fats and Bumpers?

Read FAT AND GRINNING by Breena Clarke in weekly episodes https://amzn.to/3qLwGky

New episodes on Wednesday. Follow so you don’t miss a thing in this mash-up of stereotypes and stories and music and personal history.

Visiit my website: http://www.BreenaClarke.com

“One never knows, do one.” – Fats Waller

Experience the music of Thomas “Fats” Waller https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1mh7wDfNAGjlzRdMlPC5JS

Disclaimer: Fats’ music is not for everybody. He built his short, but brilliantly prolific career on laughing at himself before anybody else could. Some of his lyrics and shenanigans are cringe-worthy. He was a musical genius nevertheless.

https://amzn.to/3fHKdTO Read THERE’S A BODY IIN MY LOBBY by Esther Cohen and meet the indomitable Clara Israel. 92 or 93? Who knows? She’s using her years of wisdom and her unerring instincts about human behavior to solve a mysterious murder in her NYC apartment building. Esther Cohen returns with her hilarious nonagenarian gumshoe in weekly episodes appearing each Wednesday. Don’t miss the latest.

Check out more Esther Cohen at : http://www.esthercohen.com

NOW, an online journal

Hobart Festival of Women Writers has published the first issue of a new online journal featuring new work from some of the many published women authors who have been Participating Writers at Hobart Festival of Women Writers. I’m excited to have been one of the editors of this issue. I was joined as editor by Cheryl Clarke and Esther Cohen. Read excerpts of my fiction and non-fiction here:

His Teeth

Bazemore Plantation

Bazemore, Maryland

1781

His gleaming, ivory-colored teeth could have stood in his mouth for another lifetime, but each fell beneath the knife. They bound him to a plank. They dosed him with alcohol to quiet his howling as the horse surgeon pillaged his incisors, his molars, and his bicuspids. They took his teeth because he was a persistent escapee, had run away seven times and bore marks of whipping and brining.

There were no rotted teeth in his mouth, no broken ones, none were misshapen, and not a single one was missing. Very great was the resistance of the teeth to being pulled out. They were moved not at all by the horse surgeon’s pliers. He reconsidered and took up a knife and an awl and cut away the gums until the teeth could hold no longer. Several times the man nearly drowned on the massive amounts of blood in his mouth. Yanked upright, turned over a bucket to spit, salted water flushed into his mouth, more whiskey poured down his throat, the work continued until each tooth was dug out undamaged. Each was cleaned, admired, and carefully placed in a wired device fitted for the master’s mouth.

read more:https://www.hfwwnow.com/blog/95h3zk8uu650o7agjgc6qaiaedropg

Aunt Jemima, Eleanor Bumpers, Sandra Bland, and Breonna Taylor: Writing Against The Current  

I never thought I’d be updating the dramatic work, “Re/Membering Aunt Jemima: A Menstrual Show” or even seriously reconsidering it. Written more than twenty-five years ago, the play contains topical references that I thought would seem stale in the 21st century. Glenda Dickerson and I had, in writing “Aunt Jemima: A Menstrual Show,” flung ourselves at notions of racial propriety. We didn’t want to write a domestic drama full of polite insistence that black people are worthy of Western civilization. We wanted to confront the popular culture of negative images of Black Women in messy confrontational language.


read my entire essay at https://www.hfwwnow.com/blog/g89bnakx17u4jne2r8wlib0u6r9d2a

NOW, an online journalhttp://hfwwnow.com features also the work of Alexis DeVeaux, Maria Mazziotti Gillan, Arisa White, Lisa Wujnovich, Esther Cohen, Elena Schwolsky, Cheryl Boyce Taylor, Marina Cramer, Julie Enszer, Aine Greaney, Ellen Meeropol, Bertha Rogers, Linda Lowen, Diane Gilliam, Dahlma Llanos Figueroa, Denise B. Dailey, Cheryl Clarke and Stephanie Nikolopoulos

http://www.BreenaClarke.com